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Archive for October, 2017

There’s a point at the beginning of any project when I really wonder why I bother. It’s the point where I’m trying to do all the boring engineering type stuff to make things fit. If I get this wrong nothing will fit together and the locomotive, wagon, or whatever wobbles about or falls off the track in an embarrassing manner, so I have to just grit my teeth, remind myself that this means there will be fun detailing and weathering to be done later.

It’s a bit like eating your vegetables in the hope there will be a nice dessert.

Anyway. After a certain amount of measuring and false starts, this is the result, a box that fits an old chassis from my stockpile. The gap I the casing is for wires to come through in case I get all enthusiastic about electricity and wire up the LED lights.

It might happen, you never know.

Of course, having done this I realised I’d gone end made life difficult for myself, again because now I can’t just glue everything together: I need to make the outer body clip onto this, just in case I decide one day that I want the lights to work.

Once again I’ve followed a brilliant plan without thinking it through and I’m now dealing with the consequences.

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I have spent far more time than is good for me wandering about looking at old buildings I can adapt for Wörnritzhausen, and typically after taking photos all over the place I suddenly remembered this fine example just around the corner from our apartment.

All around the village older buildings are being demolished to make way for ugly but lucrative apartments, but apparently this is under some kind of legal protection as an important structure, so it can’t just be torn down.

It used to be used for student flats but it has been empty for several years now. Maybe it is just too cold in winter.

 

I’m guessing that it was once a farm because of the barn next door. The cellar looks like it it has a big solid stone wall. Maybe that is from an older house, that happened quite a bit around these parts.


Steps up to the front door. When this was a student residence it was usually open with some interesting and on occasion probably quite illegal fragrances coming out of it.

Mysterious door behind the steps. The cellar looks too small to me for keeping animals in, so what is this about?

It’d make one heck of a model railway room.

After waving a tape measure around a bit and doing some seriously wooly maths, I decided that this will fit nicely on the model. Only thing is, it needs to be the other way around, so I flipped the image over the get an idea of what it will look like.

Now I’m feeling slightly disorientated.

 

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Sometimes I wish I could be like those people who stop bothering about making trains and build beautiful dioramas instead. I’d get all the fun of making something and adding lots of details without all that pesky electrical jiggerypokery with attendant swearing and surreptitious prodding to make things work. I can’t though: for me the railway is the reason for the rest: the thread that holds the story together. Besides, I couldn’t make dioramas that well so I need something to distract people.

This means a large chunk of model making time this week was used up testing out various second hand chassis of questionable heritage that I’ve been amassing over the last few years, to decide which one should go under the big diesel.

It would have been a bit faster if I hadn’t stolen some of the connectors from my test track to make wiring for “Wörnritzhausen”, probably because I’d lost the others, so I had to find the other one and fix everything back together. Then I had to dig up a 3.5mm jack socket which I was really quite startled to find. Once all this was together, I placed one of the chassis of questionable heritage -originally intended, I think for a HO model of an EMD F7– and turned on the power.

Nothing.

Out came the super-dooper all singing all dancing voltmeter. This showed nothing was getting through to the track.

I reached back to turn off the controller, and jogged the 3.5mm jack connection. The chassis shot towards the distant end of the track before being rugby tackled by Youngest Son.

Having established that the chassis could move under power, we spent a bit of time making sure it runs at more sensible speeds, which it managed remarkably well considering it’s languished in a box for several years.

Finally, to my rather great relief, we found that the railcar chassis works. I’m sure I’ve tested this before but I can’t remember doing it.

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I got fed up with the gate looking like the backdrop for a cheap Gothic novel and decided to brighten things up a bit. It went surprisingly quickly, just thirty minutes to make it look a bit more like weathered limestone, then 10 minutes to tone it down, and another 45 to get it back to how it was in the first place.

I’m not bad at painting, just really indecisive.

I’m generally happy now. The stones are highlighted using a method I learned many years ago in theatre: the top and left of the blocks are painted cream and the bottom ans right grey/brown to emphasise the depth. I fretted for a bit about it being cartoon-like but I worried about that when I weathered the Post Office and now I can hardly see the weathering so I’ll leave it as it is for now.

I’ll leave the panel for the crest as well, at least until I can think of an idiot-proof way of making the a crest that works. Wörnritzhausen is supposed to be near Münsingen, but I think it would have had its own crest representing the rivers or the trade that would have paid for the city wall. Will have to think about that.

It needs a roof as well. Unfortunately I forgot that with the thick walls the roof will come over the top of the windows, making shutters unlikely, so it will have to do without. Gutters and drainpipes will have to wait until I’ve worked out how the farmhouse next door should look.

Still, the trains now run onto the scene through a real gate. It looks like we are getting somewhere, slowly.

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